BACK
PAST Exhibitions
Jelena Vasiljev, Miha Štrukelj, Mariela Gemisheva

Go East!
From 24.09.2004 to 30.10.2004

Miha Štrukelj – Chernobyl Infinity
Chernobyl Infinity
2004
olio su tela
140 x 170 cm  
Jelena Vasiljev – Essendo così i lupi / i più difficili da cacciare / come saranno gli uomini
Essendo così i lupi / i più difficili da cacciare / come saranno gli uomini
2004
chalk, gauze, jute, oakum
variabile dimensions
Mariela Gemisheva – Out of Myself
Out of Myself
2002
color ink-jet prints
150 x 103 cm
Miha Štrukelj – Portrait I
Portrait I
1998
olio su tela
130 x 120 cm  
Miha Štrukelj – Selfportrait I
Selfportrait I
1997
olio su tela
120 x 100 cm  
Miha Štrukelj – Selfportrait II
Selfportrait II
1997
olio su tela
120 x 100 cm  
Miha Štrukelj – The City 5
The City 5
2004
olio su tela
100 x 150 cm  
Miha Štrukelj – Ultrasound
Ultrasound
1998
olio su tela
100 x 120 cm  
Miha Štrukelj – Untitled
Untitled
2003
olio su tela
100 x 140 cm  
Miha Štrukelj – Untitled
Untitled
2003
olio su tela
100 x 140 cm  
Miha Štrukelj – Untitled
Untitled
2005
olio su tela
170 x 140 cm  
Miha Štrukelj – Untitled
Untitled
1999
olio su tela
50 x 70 cm  
Miha Štrukelj – Virtual Cockpit I
Virtual Cockpit I
1999
olio su tela
100 x 120 cm  

Go East!

Alla luce della realtà politica odierna si potrebbe definire l’area dei Balcani una mera denominazione geografica: i forti paradossi e contrasti nati dalle sue tormentate vicende storiche hanno reso l’insieme dei territori che compongono la penisola balcanica quanto di più lontano si può pensare da un luogo che, da solo, identifichi popoli e culture. Eppure è innegabile il fil rouge che unisce queste genti in apparenza divise su tutto: politica, religione, matrici culturali, mentalità.
Un forte senso di fermento, di elaborazione del lutto in senso creativo, di profonda energia traspare come un segnale costante, da nord a sud, pur con toni e colori diversi.
Nella stessa espressione artistica si possono immediatamente percepire le differenze tra la Slovenia, ad esempio, ed altri paesi dei Balcani: il “black humor” adottato da un serbo o da un bosniaco non sarebbe concepito da uno sloveno. Eppure, se vogliamo adottare la teoria che vede nell’artista un “veggente”, i tre artisti qui presenti in mostra – lo sloveno Miha Štrukelj, la serba Jelena Vasiljev e la bulgara Mariela Gemisheva – ci danno il polso di quale sarà l’atteggiamento di questi popoli nel prossimo futuro: lo sguardo criticamente puntato a ovest, una grande consapevolezza e fierezza delle proprie radici, una vigorosa esternazione priva di sovrastrutture.
I popoli dei Balcani, che tutto hanno visto, sono pronti a guardare se stessi e gli altri con una lucidità che non possiamo fare a meno di rilevare.

——

In view of today’s current political situation, the Balkans area might be considered as no more than a geographical designation: the great paradoxes and contrasts that have emerged from its agonizing historical affairs have made the group of territories that form the Balkan peninsular just about as far as one could imagine from an area that, by itself, gives an identity to its peoples and cultures. And yet it cannot be denied that there is a guiding thread that nevertheless unites these peoples who appear divided in everything: politics, religion, cultural backgrounds, mentality. A powerful sense of dynamism, of intense energy, and of working on grief in a creative manner, shows through as a constant signal, from north to south, even though with varying shades of colour and tone.

The differences between Slovenia, for example, and other countries in the Balkans is immediately noticeable in its artistic expression: The black humour of a Serb or a Bosnian would never be understood by a Slovenian. And yet if we wish to accept the theory that artists are somehow clairvoyant, the three in this exhibition – the Slovenian Miha _trukelj, the Serbian Jelena Vasiljev and the Bulgarian Mariela Gemisheva – give us a feeling of what the approach of these peoples will be in the near future: a critical eye towards the west, a profound awareness of and pride in their own roots, and a vigorous externalisation free from any superstructures. The people of the Balkans, as we have all seen, are prepared to look at themselves and others with a level of clear-headedness that we cannot fail to point out.

At the Gas Art Gallery, Bulgarian artist and fashion designer M a r i e l a Gemisheva is showing her Fashion Fire video installation, the performance carried out in the courtyard of Sofia’s Fire and Emergency Safety Service. The fashion show, which starts out as a normal catwalk parade of models, gradually acquires a different overtone: with the same composure as during the show, and betraying only a slight indication of ironic maliciousness, they unveil themselves and throw their clothes into the fire.

With this cathartic gesture, the artist focuses her attention – and the reference is clear in the subtitle of the video, The nice thing of one decent beauty queen – on the liberation of Fashion from the canons and unwritten rules that regulate its mechanisms.

As the artist sees it, the dress is no more than a supposition, a code that has to succeed in expressing the personality of the individual, a balanced compromise between social conventions and freedom of expression: when it no longer lives up to these premises, it is deprived of its function. In the Out Of Myself series of self-portraits, the artist offers herself as the subject of her art: not without an ironic realisation of her own ability to mutate, she becomes a witness to the infinite possibilities that Fashion, once again viewed as a potential means of expression that is free from regulations, conventions and rules imposed by society, and that is conceded to the individual.
Miha Strukelj displays a selection of oil on canvas paintings that interpret the technological implications of the contemporary world. The first works, Self-portrait I and II of 1997, are surprising views of the artist’s skull on an x-ray plate. Strukelj uses painting to point out how the body and mind of each individual is constantly scanned, turned into pictures, mapped out and even manipulated. From 1998 to 2002 he made paintings with modified colours, taking inspiration from sources as diverse as ultrasound scanning and radar plotting, or the obsessive routes of video games (Ultrasound, Portrait I, Virtual Cockpit I). The latest works, of 2003 and 2004 (Chernobyl Infinity and The City 5) underscore the anaesthetising, and even aesthetic function of contemporary pictures mediated by and for mass communication, and used to control and manage reality, partly in an attempt to conceal its most traumatic dimension. The subjects of Strukelj’s work are indeed pictures taken from the media, from the Web, and from videogames, though they are treated with the gestural expressiveness and slow pace of the traditional oil on canvas technique. Strukelj uses the two-dimensionality of painting to freeze the moving images of technology and project the observer into an alternative dimension, midway between reality and make-believe. Radar, monitors, and video screens capture reality through the eyes of technology; _trukelj’s painting shows an awareness of the deceptive and the over-refining role of scientific vision, in all its accepted media senses.

Jelena Vasiljev exhibits an installation that requires about 60 plaster wolves, taking inspiration from a work by Serb poet Matija Beckovic. The wolf – the perfect metaphor of deranged violence and savage rapacity – when in the multiplication of the pack, becomes a symbol of the individual nullified by the community. Instead of leading to salvation, it drags everyone towards a single cruel and uncontrollable destiny of waiting. The artist obsessively portrays the wolf using other media too (drawings, video, photography, and the word) to the extent that he makes it an insistent motif for reflection. It becomes an artistic-narrative form of expression that, each time in an original manner, tells of the drama and poetry of a fate ordained more through free choice than by nature. And yet, in marked contrast, the artist appears to be suggest and believe that it will once again be we human beings–and not our darker side, the wolf – who will decide our own existence. And not vice versa.

Mariela Gemisheva

Mariela Gemisheva conduce la propria attività di artista e di fashion designer a Sofia, città dove è nata, in una realtà sociale -quella bulgara- dove concetti come glamour e fashion sono stati per lungo tempo estranei. Eppure Mariela ha fatto di questa situazione un’importante occasione per lavorare sulla Moda come concetto astratto, come pura ricerca espressiva, libera da pregiudizi, dove la finalità non è tanto (o non solo) la produzione e la commercializzazione seriale degli abiti: le sue creazioni sono in realtà vere e proprie analisi critiche ai codici sottointesi della moda e ai suoi preconcetti non-detti. Tutto questo senza rinunciare alla vestibilità e alla portabilità di abiti “veri”, grazie ai quali l’artista viene insignita per due volte il Premio Golden Needle per la moda d’avanguardia, conferitole dall’Accademia di Moda Bulgara. Alla Gas Art Gallery l’artista presenta la videoinstallazione Fashion Fire, una performance realizzata nel cortile del Fire and Emergency Safety di Sofia. La sfilata di moda, che inizia come una consueta passerella di modelle, (e la prima modella ci illude che tutto si svogerà secondo routine) assume via via una nuova connotazione: le indossatrici, con la stessa compostezza con cui hanno sfilato, tradendo appena un accenno di ironica cattiveria, si svelano dei propri abiti, disegnati da Mariela, per gettarli nel fuoco. Con questo gesto catartico l’artista focalizza la sua attenzione – e il riferimento è evidente nel sottotitolo del video The nice thing of one decent beauty queen (Il bel gesto di una reginetta di bellezza per bene) – sulla liberalizzazione della Moda dai canoni e dalle regole non scritte che da sempre ne regolano i meccanismi. Il vestito, nelle intenzioni dell’artista, è solo un presupposto, un codice che deve riuscire a esprimere la personalità individuale, un giusto compromesso tra libertà espressiva e convenzioni sociali: nel momento in cui disattende queste premesse, esso viene privato della sua funzione. In particolare i vestiti di questa collezione, particolarmente romantici, leziosi, rappresentano per l’artista un modello di donna ormai superato ma ancora fortemente canonizzato dai codici sociali: un modello da cui è necessario liberarsi, simbolicamente e concretamente. Le modelle, da “oggetti d’arte”, diventano “soggetti d’arte”, dotate di una loro autonomia, pur compiendo, allo stesso tempo, la volontà della stilista-artista, novelle sacerdotesse di un rito purificatorio: ognuna brucia il vestito secondo la propria indole. Al contrario delle figure femminili di Vanessa Beecroft, disumanizzate presenze estetizzanti, ritratte in pose asettiche e alienate, le modelle di Mariela esprimono sentimenti di ironica ribellione, di attivo rifiuto, non scevro da una certa dose di cattiveria; in parte si riappropriano anche della loro femminilità: si coprono pudicamente il seno, la loro nudità non è sfacciatamente esibita. Nel loro gesto ripetuto a passo di musica si compie la cerimonia della sfilata “al rovescio”, corredata da una conclusone altrettanto simbolica e surreale: nell’uscita finale per raccogliere il consueto applauso del pubblico, la stilista brucia il vestito che aveva aperto la sfilata – il più romantico e languido – (l’unico che era stato “graziato”), a ribadire il concetto di una volontà distruttiva e liberatoria. Nel finto salvataggio di Mariela da parte di un vigile del fuoco l’artista pone ironicamente in salvo almeno se stessa. Nella serie di autoritratti Out of Myself è sempre l’artista, in un’arguta presa di coscienza delle proprie capacità di trasformismo, a proporsi come testimone delle infinite possibilità che la Moda, intesa nuovamente come reale potenzialità espressiva libera da norme, convenzioni e regole imposte dalla società, concede all’individuo. |

Miha Štrukelj

La ricerca espressiva di Miha Štrukelj, giovane artista sloveno di Ljubljana, mira a indagare e reinterpretare le implicazioni tecnologiche nel mondo contemporaneo e nel vivere quotidiano. Le prime opere, datate 1997 (Selfportrait I e II), sono sorprendenti “autoritratti” del cranio dell’artista ripreso da una lastra radiografica. Attraverso la sua pittura Štrukelj evidenzia come il corpo e la mente di ogni individuo siano costantemente scansiti, trasformati in immagini, mappati e perfino manipolati. Tra il 1998 e il 2002 realizza dipinti dai cromatismi alterati, le cui ispirazioni spaziano da fonti ecografiche a realtà impresse da sistemi radar o inserite in percorsi ossessivi di videogiochi (Ultrasound, Portrait I, Virtual Cockpit I). Gli ultimi lavori del 2003 e 2004 (Chernobyl Infinity e The City 5) sottolineano la funzione anestetizzante delle immagini contemporanee, mediate dalla comunicazione di massa, e utilizzate per controllare e gestire la realtà, anche nel tentativo di nasconderne la dimensione traumatica. L’artista afferma:”…Molte immagini tratte dai conflitti presenti nel mondo vengono trasmesse attraverso i media. Io indago in tale estetizzazione della violenza. Ciascun individuo, tranne chi ne è direttamente coinvolto, vede e pensa al conflitto attraverso tali immagini…”. I soggetti delle opere di Štrukelj, infatti, sono frames tratti dai media, dal web, dai videogames, trattati, tuttavia, con la gestualità, la lentezza, i toni morbidi e caldi della tradizionale tecnica dell’olio su tela. Attraverso la bidimensionalità della pittura, Štrukelj fissa le immagini ‘in movimento’ della tecnologia e proietta il fruitore in una dimensione alternativa, a metà tra realtà e finzione. Radar, monitors, videoschermi colgono la realtà attraverso l’occhio della tecnologia: la pittura di Štrukelj propone una presa di coscienza del ruolo ingannatore ed estetizzante della visione scientifica, in tutte le sue accezioni mediatiche.

Jelena Vasiljev

Il punto di partenza da cui è nata l’idea di questo lavoro di Jelena Vasiljev è una straordinaria poesia di uno dei maggiori poeti serbi viventi, Matija Beckovic, intitolata Pugnale. Qui si descrive il modo in cui, secondo un’antica favola, nell’estremo nord venivano cacciati i lupi. I cacciatori piantavano un coltello affilatissimo sui due lati nel ghiaccio facendogli colare sopra del sangue fresco. Il lupo affamato leccava il coltello e la lama tagliandosi la lingua. Continuando a leccare il proprio sangue arrivavano fino alla morte. “Essendo così i lupi/ i più difficili da cacciare/come saranno gli uomini/e i popoli interi/e soprattutto il nostro/che di sangue proprio non si sazia mai…” Questa tragica riflessione poetica rimane per così dire implicita nell’installazione dell’artista (solo come scritta al suolo) e funziona da silenziosa voce di fondo generatrice dell’immaginario visivo. La scena che vediamo è formata da una vera e propria muta di molte decine di lupi, modellati in gesso grezzo, nelle più varie positure: lupi che camminano, che corrono, che si arrampicano, sdraiati, in piccoli gruppi o solitari; lupi di varie dimensioni, magri e minacciosi, ma anche commoventi nella loro disperata animalità. Sono disposti a caso, senza nessun ordine o formazione, su scure lastre di acciaio brunito che sembrano segnare i confini della loro prigione. Su un muro è proiettato un video di pochi minuti in cui si vedono i lupi in gabbia dello zoo di Belgrado che camminano avanti e indietro in modo ossessivo, che aggrediscono la cinepresa, che mangiano della carne sanguinolenta. Le immagini sono interrotte ogni tanto dalla velocissima apparizione di tracce lineari nere che solo dopo un po’ appaiono come sintetiche ma precise immagini disegnate degli animali. Lo stesso tipo di disegni sono graffiti direttamente su un altro muro o sono tracciati su una serie di candidi fogli. L’installazione occupa una grande stanza nel seminterrato. All’inizio della scala in alto un grosso lupo sta posando le sue zampe sui gradini per scendere, insieme ai visitatori umani.

Francesco Poli