BACK
PAST Exhibitions
Margot Quan Knight

On time
From 21.09.2007 to 27.10.2007

Margot Quan Knight – Dorm Cereal
Dorm Cereal
2006
lambda print on aluminium
70 x 100 cm
ed. 7  
Margot Quan Knight – Dorm Plants
Dorm Plants
2006
lambda print on aluminium
70 x 100 cm
ed. 7
Margot Quan Knight – Dorm Red
Dorm Red
2006
lambda print on aluminium
70 x 100 cm
ed. 7  
Margot Quan Knight – Drop (Intervals)
Drop (Intervals)
2006
lambda print on aluminium
100 x 70 cm
ed. 7
Margot Quan Knight – Float (Intervals)
Float (Intervals)
2006
lambda print on aluminium
70 x 100 cm
ed. 7  
Margot Quan Knight – Hot Tub (Intervals)
Hot Tub (Intervals)
2006
lambda print on aluminium
100 x 70 cm
ed. 7  
Margot Quan Knight – Shelter (Intervals)
Shelter (Intervals)
2006
lambda print on aluminium
70 x 100 cm
ed. 7  
Margot Quan Knight – Un Dress (Intervals)
Un Dress (Intervals)
2006
lambda print on aluminium
70 x 100 cm
ed. 7  
Margot Quan Knight – Veil Diptych
Veil Diptych
2006
lambda print on aluminium
2 elements 70 x 100 cm each
ed. 7

Est enim tempus? 

Does time exist? This question, asked by Augustine in the 11th book of his Confessions, marks a radical break in the history of Western thought. Modernity begins here, in the 4th century AD, with the anxious reflections of the bishop of Hippo, who reveals his painful torment for being unable to rationally capture the enigmatic essence of time and of its whirling flow. “Dissipated in the succession of times I do not know” and “dismembered in the tumult of events”, Augustine views the traditional division into past, present, and future as a shaky illusion, given the fleetingness of the present and the impossibility to reduce it to a solid, extended entity. What he expresses is a totally modern feeling of anxiety, like the one Heidegger – himself a careful reader of Augustine – would describe more clearly 15 centuries later, talking about Geworfenheit, the condition of “being thrown”, as the founding quality of being, which is aware of its own limits and of its being plunged in the abyss of temporality. However, in the Confessions, Augustine’s strict analysis of the nature of time leads him to a decisive intuition: In te, anime meus, tempora metior. In you, my spirit, I measure time. 

Time does not have any existence per se – a rational analysis will never be able to seize it. It is our inner self that generates time. Time is nothing but an extension of our conscience, an inner space of our soul. Actually, Augustine argues, it is we ourselves who measure the impression the passing of things makes on our soul, and organize the extension of past, present and future by means of present perception and memory. Thus conscience finds continuity and duration within our impressions, spreading itself harmoniously and naturally between memory (past), attention-vision (present), and expectation (future). 

Both recent works by Margot Quan Knight, Portrait of a Woman 1947-2007 and Window, reverberate Augustine’s intuition of time as the product of our conscience and of our insight. The initial question that prompted the artist to create these works is actually generated by the mystery of the subjective experience of time, with its distortions and unpredictability – for instance, a few minutes can seem extremely long when the individual is worried, and conversely, in the flow of memories, months and years may seem to contract into a few fleeting moments. In Portrait of a Woman, the artist mounted, in an extremely rapid succession, a series of different single photo shots, which show, in the foreground, the face of her mother, from the remote years of her early childhood until the present day. It is a lightning-fast visual account, built in real time through a phenomenology of everyday life: moments of distraction, private scenes, and details shared by everyone in their everyday life. The continuity of the narration is given by the unfolding of time and of the seasons of life, made evident by the rapid changes that affect the woman’s face. A few decades, full of events and developments, are amalgamated into a less than two minute long video. While the artist uses this strategy to emphasize her wonder at the fleetingness of life and its evolution, which is still in progress, Portrait of a woman is also a first, immediate meditation on the problem of time, which reveals an effort to identify a possible thread of continuity. 
Windows is a technically more complex work, a video installation built on a blurry photographic image of Margot Quan Knight’s face. On it, the artist projects a video montage with the traits of her grandmother, of her mother, and of herself. The difference between these two heterogeneous elements, photo and video, is not immediately perceivable. On the contrary, it is organized so that the first photo image, static and inaccurate, receives a series of details and additions from the elements projected onto it, letting the faces of three generations of women flow one after the other, in an almost physiognomic attempt at reconstructing a strictly private family genealogy, tracing the artist’s own face, present and future, to the ones of those who have come before her chronologically. In this work the feeling of continuity, which had already been captured in nuce in Portrait of a Woman, comes to its conceptual and emotional awareness, and turns out to be very close to Augustine’s intuition of conscience as the place of time, but also to the 20th century, and to Henri Bergson’s reflections, which feed considerably on those of the bishop of Hippo. In the words of the French philosopher, the static, unusually sharply-defined image of memory loses its value, for it is the product of rational analysis, which does not capture the full, flowing reality of memory. Only duration, thanks to its mobility, is the source that can reveal the mechanisms of time. “Inner duration is the continuous life of a memory that extends the past into the present”, Bergson argues, and his reflection applies perfectly to the work of Margot Quan Knight. She rejects the abstract quality of a single image, or a single portrait, in favor of a communion between different elements (the faces of the three women), in order to condense the actual continuity of a family’s life experience. Here, the web of time is rendered in its natural fluidity, where past memories, present perceptions, and future expectations come to the synthesis of a harmonically complete concordance. Each of the three times actually received information, illumination, and a deeper perspective from the other, forming a layered structure that is as necessary as it is potentially inexhaustible. 

Both Portrait of a Woman and Window use the image of the face to tackle the issue of time. This choice has a strong symbolic value, which recalls an extremely rich tradition in the history of Western thought – from the inquiries into physiognomy of Romantic thinkers, who sought in the human face the somatic traces of man’s likeness to the divine (in Your image and likeness…), down to the reflections of Emmanuel Lévinas’s, whose moral philosophy reaffirmed the value of the face as the very first meeting place in the mutuality of human knowledge. For the French thinker, the meeting with the face of the other is the mark of an otherness that is close to us, an otherness that reveals, and makes possible, every form of community life and sharing. 
Thus the crucial importance of the face in Quan Knight’s research is indicative of her attempt at averting the feeling of uneasiness generated by the impossibility to rationally control time – and at recapturing harmony, first of all through the gestures and stories of her family. This intimate dimension is subsequently elevated to a universal dimension, through the metaphorical use the artist makes of it, turning it into the object of empathy, of identification, something everyone can feel through the immediate evidence and recognizability of the images. 

Next to these video works, the artist has created a series of new photo shots, where the gesture of the artist seems to concentrate on an apparently opposite practice with respect to that of Portrait of a Woman and Windows. The subjects are visual fragments of falling objects, frozen sprouts of water, and home-life gestures captured in their painterly volume. These images are almost impossible in their incisively visual fixedness. They emanate a fascination that comes from their extremely thick symbolic condensation, not unlike that of the poetic word, which gets concentrated up to extremely high degrees of semantic density. Here, the narrative quality of the two preceding video works becomes less significant, leaving room for a more enigmatic interrogation that once again reveals the artist’s desire to inquire into the sense of time by turning to prosaic normality and the domestic spaces of everyday life. This time Quan Knight tries to decompose the continuity of movement, the fluidity of events, fathoming the almost abstract immobility of a single image. Like a paradoxical demonstration built on an ad absurdum reduction, these shots again confirm the perception of the impossibility to conceptualize time by dividing it into rigid, arbitrary categories. All these photo representations of objects and people, including the artist herself, inevitably recall events and thoughts that preceded and generated them, restoring them back to the full continuity of time and life. Therefore, the thin line that accompanies these events becomes the positive propulsive force of an ever more determined will to understand, and become involved into, the current everyday events of the world. 

This humanist will to interrogate reality, which characterizes the whole work of Quan Knight, can be easily resumed in the formula ‘taking care’, a favorite with the European existentialist culture of the 20th century. It is not by chance that the artist has given this title to a photo series she did in 2003 – Taking Care, where the subjects of the shots are plastic reconstructions of dismembered, fragmented bodies. Hands and arms, along with unrecognizable portions of limbs, become the silent metaphors of an emotional urgency that builds on the score of a surrealist grammar, and aims at generating a feeling of bafflement in the spectators, forcing them to reflect on the hidden violence that characterizes modern time. The yielding sinuosity of these images, set in home environments and indefinitely open spaces, suggests both an empathic invitation to renew your approach to the times and thoughts of others, those who are closest to us and share our most private everyday life. Indeed, what clearly emerges is the symbology of the embrace, viewed as protection, as a containment wall against any kind of dismemberment and shattering. 

This emotional strategy can also be observed in the Veins (2004) series, where the artist appropriates the practice of embroidery to represent the dispersion of blood spilling out of garments and living creatures, as well as the flowing of traces of wine dropping from a glass. The image of the hemorrhage, made inerasable by the weft of embroidery, is once again a symbolical representation of a state of alarm and danger – almost a harbinger of what could happen to the soldier who wears this uniform, but also a signal of the persistence of memory and the overflow of individual emotionality. In Veins there is no longer any distinction between animated and inanimate objects – both are destined to go adrift, but within this shared destiny Margot Quan Knight seems to seek a stop, a possible suture to interrupt the dissolution and restore a stable balance in the relationship between the objects and our perception of them, past, present and future. In many respects, Quan Knight’s work seems to insistently inquire into the very mechanisms of uneasiness and implosion, into the thin threads that hold the poise of a difficult balance. The artist already dealt with this theme in The Hunt (2004) series, a photo survey on the life of couples aimed at reconsidering, from a contemporary perspective, the decadence of the American Pioneer mythology, and the current impossibility of that traditional culture, made of stable certainties and unshakable values. A similar structure, although more direct and concise, is also the theme of a new video installation, Support (2007), which shows the impossible vital cycle forcibly experienced by a woman and a man, united by one single medical tube, which unites their breaths. This situation is, clearly, physically unsustainable, due to the rapid exhaustion of oxygen – but the artist tries to prolong it by means of an infinite loop, which exacerbates to paroxysm the metaphorical image of two symbiotically organized lives, unable to diverge and acquire the stability of autonomy. Thus, in Margot Quan Knight’s work, independence and the acceptance of one’s inevitable solitude turn out to be extreme experiences, regulatory ideals open to philosophical interrogation and restored to the mystery of individuality and singularity.

A recent, particularly effective image is UnDress (2007), which shows Margot Quan Knight in a bridal gown, on her wedding day. The white dress, solemnly waving in the air, enfolds the body of the young woman, and is captuerd an instant before falling on the ground, after the artist has taken it off at the end of a day of ceremonies and celebrations. There is no time left, another day is about to fall into the oblivion of the past, but it only takes an instant, an exercise of concentration, and that dress will forever remain suspended in the air, the witness of a perfect reconciliation with time and the secret of memory.

ùLuigi Fassi

Margot Quan Knight
di Luigi Fassi
Est enim tempus?
Esiste il tempo? Questa domanda posta da Agostino nell’11° libro delle Confessioni segna una spaccatura radicale nella storia del pensiero occidentale. La modernità inizia qui, nel IV secolo dopo Cristo, nell’ansiosa riflessione del vescovo di Ippona, che manifesta un tormento doloroso nell’incapacità di afferrare razionalmente la natura enigmatica del tempo e del suo scorrere vorticoso. “Dissipato nella successione di tempi che non conosco” e “smembrato dal tumulto delle vicende”, ad Agostino la scansione tradizionale di passato-presente-futuro appare un’illusione inconsistente, data la fugacità del presente e l’impossibilità di ridurlo ad un’entità solida ed estesa. È un angoscia completamente moderna, quella che Heidegger, acuto lettore di Agostino, focalizzerà ulteriormente 15 secoli dopo, parlando della Geworfenheit, la gettatezza, caratteristica fondante dell’essere, che si riconosce limitato e collocato nell’abisso della temporalità.
Nelle Confessioni, tuttavia, la serrata analisi di Agostino sulla natura del tempo giunge a un’intuizione decisiva: In te, anime meus, tempora metior. È in te, spirito mio, che misuro il tempo.
Il tempo non ha uno statuto autonomo, che invano si cercherebbe con un’analisi razionale, ma è la nostra interiorità a generare il tempo. Esso non è altro che un’estensione della nostra coscienza, una spazio interno al nostro animo. Siamo noi infatti, argomenta Agostino, a misurare l’impressione che le cose producono nel nostro animo al loro passaggio, e ad articolare tramite la percezione presente e la memoria, l’estensione di passato presente e futuro. La coscienza trova così una continuità, una durata all’interno delle nostre impressioni, distendendosi in maniera armonica e naturale tra memoria (il passato), attenzione-visione (il presente) e attesa (il futuro).
Entrambi i recenti lavori di Margot Quan Knight, Portrait of a Woman 1947-2007 e Window, riverberano tale intuizione agostiniana del tempo come prodotto delle nostre coscienza e delle nostre intuizioni. L’interrogazione iniziale che ha mosso l’artista nella produzione di queste opere è infatti generata dal mistero della soggettiva esperienza del tempo, con le sue distorsioni e imprevedibilità, come quando alcuni minuti, all’apprensione personale, possono sembrare lunghissimi e, viceversa, nel flusso dei ricordi, mesi e anni apparire contratti in pochi istanti fugaci.
In Portrait of a Woman, l’artista ha montato in rapidissima successione una molteplicità di singoli scatti fotografici che ritraggono in primo piano il volto della madre, dai lontani anni della sua prima infanzia sino ai giorni odierni. È un fulmineo racconto visivo, costruito in presa diretta mediante una fenomenologia della vita quotidiana, tra momenti di svago, scene private e dettagli comuni alla vita di tutti. La continuità della narrazione è data dal dipanarsi del tempo e delle stagioni della vita, rese manifeste nel rapido mutamento che coinvolge il volto della donna. Alcuni decenni colmi di eventi e di evoluzioni si amalgamano nel video in meno di due minuti. Se l’artista segnala così la propria meraviglia nel constatare la fugacità di una vita e del suo decorso, ancora in svolgimento, Portrait of a woman è anche una prima, immediata meditazione sul problema del tempo, dover si intuisce lo sforzo di individuare all’interno di esso un possibile filo di continuità.
Windows è un’opera tecnicamente più complessa, una video installazione costruita mediante un’immagine fotografica sfuocata (blurry) del volto di Margot Quan Knight, su cui l’artista proietta un montaggio video con i lineamenti della nonna, della mamma e di lei stessa. Lo scarto tra i due elementi eterogenei, la foto e il video, non è immediatamente percepibile, ma anzi organizzato in modo tale che la prima immagine fotografica, statica e imprecisa, riceva dettagli e completamenti dagli elementi che su essa si proiettano, lasciando susseguire fluidamente il passaggio tra i volti di tre generazioni femminili, in un tentativo quasi fisiognomico di ricostruire una privatissima genealogia famigliare, rintracciando il proprio volto, presente e futuro, in quello di chi cronologicamente precede. La sensazione della continuità, colta ancora in nuce in Portrait of a Woman, trova qui consapevolezza concettuale ed emozionale, in piena prossimità all’intuizione agostiniana della coscienza come sede del tempo, ma anche alle riflessioni novecentesche di Henry Bergson, sensibilmente debitrici di quelle del vescovo d’Ippona. Nelle parole del filosofo francese l’immagine statica e singolarmente definita del ricordo è da svalutarsi in quanto prodotto dell’analisi raziocinante, a cui sfugge la realtà piena e fluente della memoria. Solo la durata, con la sua mobilità, è fonte rivelatrice della dinamiche temporali. “La durata interiore è la vita continua d’una memoria che prolunga il passato nel presente”, argomenta Bergson, e ciò è perfettamente calzante nell’opera di Margot Quan Knight, che rifugge l’astrattezza chiusa di una singola immagine o di un singolo ritratto, privilegiando invece una comunione tra elementi eterogenei (i volti delle tre donne), per condensare l’autentica continuità dell’esperienza di una famiglia. La trama del tempo è qui restituita nella sua naturale fluidità, dove ricordi passati, percezioni presenti e attese future trovano la sintesi di un accordo armonicamente completo. Ciascuno dei tre tempi trae infatti ragguagli, illuminazioni e approfondimenti dall’altro, in una stratificazione necessaria quanto potenzialmente inesauribile.
Tanto Portrait of a Woman quanto Window si avvalgono dell’immagine del volto per affrontare il tema del tempo. Questa scelta ha un valore simbolico forte, che rammenta una ricchissima tradizione nella storia del pensiero occidentale, dalle indagini fisiognomiche dei pensatori romantici, che ricercavano nel volto le tracce somatiche della somiglianza e famigliarità umana con il divino (a Tua immagine e somiglianza…), sino alle riflessioni di filosofia morale di Emmanuel Lévinas, che ha richiamato l’importanza del volto come primo luogo di incontro nella reciprocità della conoscenza umana. L’incontro con il volto dell’altro è per il pensatore francese il segno di un’alterità che ci è prossima, che svela e rende possibile ogni forma di comunitarietà e condivisione.
Così la centralità del volto nella ricerca di Quan Knight è segno del tentativo di allontanare il senso di inquietudine, generato dall’impossibilità di controllare razionalmente il tempo, ritrovando una sintonia anzitutto con i gesti e le storie private della propria famiglia. Tale intimità si innalza poi a respiro universale nell’uso metaforico che ne fa l’artista, rendendola oggetto di un’immedesimazione possibile a chiunque, mediante l’immediata evidenza e riconoscibilità delle immagini.
Accanto a questi lavori video si accompagna una serie di nuovi scatti fotografici, in cui il gesto dell’artista sembra concentrarsi su un esercizio apparentemente opposto a quello di Portrait of a Woman e Window. I soggetti sono dati da frammenti visivi di oggetti che cadono, spruzzi d’acqua immobilizzati e gesti domestici colti nella silente plasticità della loro volumetria pittorica. Immagini quasi impossibili nella loro icastica fissità, questi lavori esercitano il fascino della condensazione simbolica più serrata, come nell’uso della parola poetica, concentrata sino a densità semantiche altissime. La narratività ancora forte delle due opere video precedenti si assottiglia, lasciando spazio a un’interrogazione più misteriosa, testimonianza ancora una volta del desiderio dell’artista di interrogare il senso del tempo, rivolgendosi alla normalità più prosaica e agli spazi domestici del vivere quotidiano. Quan Knight prova questa volta a scomporre la continuità del movimento e della fluidità degli eventi, sondando l’immobilità quasi astratta della singola immagine. Come una dimostrazione paradossale costruita per assurdo, tali scatti riconfermano la percezione dell’impossibilità di concettualizzare il tempo suddividendolo in categorie rigide e arbitrarie. Tutte queste rappresentazioni fotografiche di oggetti e persone, tra cui l’artista stessa, richiamano inevitabilmente a eventi e pensieri che le hanno precedute e generate, restituendole così alla piena continuità del tempo e della vita. Il filo sottile di inquietudine che accompagna tali immagini diventa dunque motore positivo di una sempre più accentuata volontà di comprensione e partecipazione alla quotidianità presente degli accadimenti e del mondo.
Questa volontà umanistica di interrogazione del reale, che caratterizza tutta l’opera di Quan Knight, è ben sintetizzabile nella formula del prendersi cura, particolarmente cara alla cultura esistenzialista del Novecento europeo.
Non è un caso che l’artista stessa abbia intitolato così una serie fotografica realizzata nel 2003, Taking Care, dove soggetti degli scatti sono ricostruzioni plastiche di corpi smembrati e parcellizzati. Mani e braccia, assieme a porzioni di arti irriconoscibili, diventano metafore silenziose di una urgenza emotiva, costruita sulla partitura di una grammatica surrealista, per generare sconcerto nello spettatore e costringere così a una riflessione sulla violenza latente che caratterizza il tempo contemporaneo. La sinuosità arrendevole di queste immagini, ambientate in scenari domestici e spazi indefinitamente aperti, suggerisce al tempo stesso un invito di tipo empatico a riaccostarsi ai tempi e ai pensieri dell’altro, di chi ci è prossimo e condivide da vicino la nostra quotidianità. Compare infatti in termini evidenti la simbologia dell’abbraccio, inteso come protezione e argine contrapposto ad ogni forma di smembramento e frantumazione.
Tale strategia emozionale è presente anche nella serie Veins(2004) dove l’artista si è appropriata della pratica del ricamo per rappresentare la dispersione di sangue fuoriuscente da vestiti e creature animate, così come il fluire di tracce di vino in caduta da un bicchiere. L’immagine dell’emorragia, resa incancellabile dalla trama del ricamo, è ancora una rappresentazione simbolica di uno stato di allarme e pericolo, quasi un presagio di ciò che potrebbe succedere al soldato che indosserà quella divisa, ma anche segnale della persistenza dei ricordi e del dilagare dell’emotività individuale. In Veins non c’è più distinzione tra oggetti animati e inanimati, entrambi sono qui accomunati da un destino ineluttabile di deriva, all’interno del quale Margot Quan Knight sembra cercare tuttavia un arresto, una possibile sutura che interrompa la dissoluzione ricreando un equilibrio stabile nel rapporto tra gli oggetti e la nostra percezione di essi, passata, presente e futura.
In molti aspetti il lavoro di Quan Knight sembra indagare con insistenza proprio le dinamiche del disagio e dell’implosione, i fili sottili che reggono il bilico di un difficile equilibrio. Tale tema è già stato affrontato dall’artista nella serie The Hunt (2004), un’indagine fotografica sulla vita di coppia, volta a riconsiderare in chiave contemporanea la decadenza della mitologia americana dei Pionieri e l’impossibilità odierna di quella cultura tradizionale, fatta di certezze stabili e valori sicuri. Un impianto simile, ma dotato di un’evidenza più diretta e sintetica, è anche il tema di una nuova videoinstallazione, Support (2007), che mostra l’impossibile ciclo vitale a cui sono costretti un uomo e una donna, uniti da un singolo tubo medico che ne unifica i respiri. L’evidente insostenibilità fisica della situazione, causata dal rapido esaurirsi dell’ossigeno, è tuttavia portata avanti in un loop infinito dall’artista, che esacerba fino al parossismo l’immagine metaforica di due vite organizzate in simbiosi, incapaci di divergere e guadagnare la stabilità dell’autonomia. L’indipendenza e l’accettazione della propria inevitabile solitudine appaiono così nell’opera di Quan Knight esperienze estreme, ideali regolativi aperti all’interrogazione filosofica e consegnati al mistero della singolarità individuale.
C’è un’immagine recente particolarmente efficace, UnDress (2007), dove si vede Margot Quan Knight in abito da sposa, il giorno delle sue nozze. Il vestito bianco, ondeggiante solenne nell’aria a rivestire il corpo della giovane donna, è colto un attimo prima di adagiarsi al suolo, ormai dismesso dall’artista, al termine della giornata di cerimonie e festeggiamenti. Non c’è più tempo, un altro giorno è prossimo all’oblio del passato, ma basta un attimo, un esercizio di concentrazione e quel vestito rimarrà in aria per sempre, testimonianza di una perfetta conciliazione con il tempo e il segreto della memoria.